ASH Daily News 30 October 2017



UK

  • Tobacco production ends in Great Britain
  • Tobacco firms using ‘clever tactics’ to target poorest smokers, study finds
  • Could ‘smokeless’ cigarettes kill off vaping?
  • For and against a tobacco retail licencing scheme
  • Rochdale: Cigarettes being shunned by borough’s young
  • ASH Scotland clarifies position on smoking at home

International

  • Canada: Study links e-cigarette among adolescents and tobacco use
  • US: Study finds peers can reduce tobacco use among younger smokers
  • Japan: Firm provides extra leave to compensate for cigarette breaks

 

UK

Tobacco production ends in Great Britain

24th October marked the day the UK ceased production of tobacco products.

The last source of production was a plant in Ballymena, Northern Ireland. The Northern Irish plant’s closure comes a year after the final tobacco factory in England – an Imperial Brands plant in Nottingham – shut.

The Northern Irish plant is to be repurposed for use by the bus manufacturer, Wrights Group.

Source: The Times, 27 October 2017
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Tobacco firms using ‘clever tactics’ to target poorest smokers, study finds

A study by researchers at the University of Bath and King’s College London has detailed the ways in which the tobacco industry seeks to prevent tobacco control measures, such as tax increases, from stopping people getting addicted to smoking. The research has been published in the journal, Tobacco Control.

Dr Rosemary Hiscock, of the Tobacco Control Research Group at the University of Bath, said: “Through sophisticated pricing strategies and clever tactics, such as price-marked packs and small pack sizes, the industry is thwarting a public health measure in order to keep smokers hooked on tobacco and their profits rolling in.”

Prof Ann McNeil, of the institute of psychiatry, psychology and neuroscience at King’s College London, said: “That real prices of some tobacco industry products have not changed since 2012 is of great concern.”

See more
Tobacco Control: Tobacco industry strategies undermine government tax policy: evidence from commercial data

Source: The Guardian, 30 October 2017
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Could ‘smokeless’ cigarettes kill off vaping?

Tobacco company Philip Morris International has spent over $3 billion developing the heat-not-burn iQos product. The product has been aimed towards smokers who cannot quit but do not like e-cigarettes.

John Britton, the director of the UK’s centre for tobacco and alcohol studies, believes the jury is still out on how successful heated tobacco products might be. “With most of these products, we have a trade-off between how safe they are and how satisfactory smokers find them as a substitute. Even with a very healthy scepticism of the validity of Philip Morris results, it is highly likely these represent a significant step towards less harmful tobacco products.”

He also thinks they will end up “on the wrong side of the risk spectrum” compared to e-cigarettes. “Because you are heating tobacco, intuitively I would expect them to carry more toxins.”

Source: The Telegraph, 30 October 2017
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For and against a tobacco retail licencing scheme

The Association of Convenience Stores’ chief executive, James Lowman, has disagreed with calls for a tobacco retail licencing scheme, citing financial and administrative burdens. Lowman meanwhile stated, ”We believe that local enforcement authorities should be given more powers to deal with those who supply and sell illicit goods, including the power to remove alcohol licences from offenders.”

Deborah Arnott, chief executive of ASH, said funding cuts to local authorities, combined with the failure of the tobacco industry to prevent diversion of goods to the illicit market was undermining the effectiveness of the Government’s strategy on illicit trade.

“We call on the Government to introduce licensing for tobacco manufacturers and retailers and to make the big tobacco companies pay for it.

“The US does this and there’s no reason why the UK can’t follow suit. It’s strongly supported both by the public and by retailers and would help achieve the Government’s ambition for a smokefree generation as well as increasing tax revenues.”

Source: Convenience Store, 27 October 2017
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Rochdale: Cigarettes being shunned by borough’s young

A new survey has found that young people in the borough of Rochdale are smoking less than before.

The survey, which was responded to by 311 high school students, looked into attitudes towards alcohol, tobacco, and e-cigarettes among young people aged 14 to 17. It was conducted by Trading Standards North West.

70% of the children said they had never smoked, with the percentage claiming to smoke having more than halved in the last ten years. Councillor Jacqueline Beswick, the council’s cabinet member for health and wellbeing, said: “It is pleasing to see that our young people are taking responsibility for their own health and wellbeing and making good lifestyle choices, which will help them thrive in the years to come.”

Source: Rochdale News, 27 October 2017
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ASH Scotland clarifies position on smoking at home

ASH Scotland, the public health charity, believes more can be done to protect people who live in social housing from secondhand smoke. The organisation has warned that exposure to smoke in the home causes “real harm” but said it does not support a ban on smoking at home.

A recent poll similarly found that a majority of adults in Britain felt people should be allowed to smoke at home. The poll was commissioned by Forest, a tobacco industry-funded organisation run by Simon Clark.

Sheila Duffy, chief executive of ASH Scotland, said: “Simon Clark is shadow-boxing with fake news.”

Source: The Times, 29 October 2017
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International

Canada: Study links e-cigarette among adolescents and tobacco use

A Canadian study has suggested there may be a link between use of e-cigarettes among teenagers and tobacco use.

However lead researcher David Hammond pointed out that this does not definitively state causality. “A lot of what we’re seeing in our study and a lot of other studies out there is a simple fact, and that is the kids who do risky things, the ones that are more likely to try e-cigarettes are also more likely to try smoking,” he said. “And guess what? They’re also more likely to try alcohol and marijuana. It’s all to do with the fact that kids who are susceptible are going to try different things.

“Youth may be trying e-cigarettes before smoking because they are easier to access,” said Hammond, noting that tobacco cannot be sold to minors.

See also
This study is to be published by the Canadian Medical Association Journal

Source: CBC, 30 October 2017
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US: Study finds peers can reduce tobacco use among younger smokers

Engaging young people in brief interventions, delivered by peers in community settings, can help reduce smoking, a study has found.

30 high school and college students led the interventions, delivering 279 interventions over 4 years in settings such as concerts and street fairs. The quit rate for those engaged with was 12.5% at six months.

See also
Journal of Community Health: A Community-Based “Street Team” Tobacco Cessation Intervention by and for Youth and Young Adults

Source: Medical Xpress, 27 October 2017
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Japan: Firm provides extra leave to compensate for cigarette breaks

Tokyo-based marketing company, Piala Inc. has granted non-smoking employees extra leave to compensate for not taking cigarette breaks.

The move comes after an employee put forward the proposal in the company suggestion box. The firm’s CEO said, “I hope to encourage employees to quit smoking through incentives rather than penalties or coercion”. The scheme has also encouraged four people to give up smoking, he added.

Source: Telegraph, 30 October 2017
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