ASH Daily News 3 October 2017



UK

  • Sheffield: Mum urges pregnant women to ditch the cigarettes as hospital becomes smokefree site
  • Smoking safety reminder after fire at Tottenham flat
  • How exercise can help you stop smoking

International

  • Australia: Philanthropist Andrew Forrest calls for tobacco ban for under-21s
  • Australia: Why we should pay people to stop smoking
  • USA: Switching to e-cigarettes could save 6.6 million American smokers
  • USA: How investing in public health could cure many health care problems

UK
Sheffield: Mum urges pregnant women to ditch the cigarettes as hospital becomes smokefree site

Sarah Bembridge quit smoking while pregnant earlier in the year and is now encouraging others to join her to mark the Jessop Wing hospital becoming a totally smokefree site.

Jessop Wing is the first of the five hospitals within Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust to ban smoking anywhere in their grounds. This means smoking shelters have been removed and staff may ask anyone seen smoking to put out their cigarettes.

Source: The Star, 2 October 2017

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Smoking safety reminder after fire at Tottenham flat

Firefighters have issued a reminder about safely disposing of cigarettes and other smoking materials after a fire at a flat in Grovelands Road in Tottenham. The cause of the fire is believed to be due to the disposal of cigarettes into a timber planter outside of the affected flat.

A London Fire Brigade spokesperson said: “If you’re a smoker it’s absolutely vital you ensure your cigarette is completely out when you’ve finished smoking it.”

Source: Parikiaki, 2 October 2017

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How exercise can help you stop smoking

Scott Laidler, a film industry personal trainer from London, writes an ep-ed offering advice on how exercise can help smoking cessation:

“As smokers try to stub out their habit for Stoptober, all stand a better chance of success if you combine quitting with exercise. Exercise helps your body to adapt to its new state of affairs. As your body recovers and then improves, you should find you enjoy both exercise and healthy eating a lot more. The habits become easier to maintain.”

Source: The Telegraph, 2 October 2017

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International
Australia: Philanthropist Andrew Forrest calls for tobacco ban for under-21s

An Australian billionaire philanthropist is urging Canberra to raise the age at which young people can buy tobacco from 18 to 21.

Andrew Forrest believes that such a move would reduce the smoking rate by 12 per cent and cut the number of deaths by tobacco by a tenth by 2020.

The campaign is part of the Eliminate Cancer initiative in which he plans to sue the tobacco industry.

Source: The Times, 2 October 2017

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Australia: Why we should pay people to stop smoking

In an op-ed, Mai Frandsen from the University of Tasmania discusses why financial incentive programs should be prioritised for smoking cessation:

“One evidence-based approach that has not received much attention in Australia is using financial incentives. Incentives programs reward quitters for not smoking by giving them a monetary voucher. The quitter’s abstinence is verified using biochemical tests of either their saliva, urine or breath.

“Financial incentive programs are considered the most effective strategy for pregnant smokers. They are also cost effective, with the calculated net benefit being around A$4,300 per smoker, per attempt to quit.”

Source: Medical Xpress, 2 October 2017

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USA: Switching to e-cigarettes could save 6.6 million American smokers

Up to 6.6 million early deaths in America might be averted over 10 years if smokers switched to e-cigarettes, researchers said on Monday.

In an analysis of potential health benefits of getting smokers to quit tobacco, the researchers found that those 6.6 million people who switched to vaping would live for a collective total of up to 86.7 million extra years.

See More:
Tobacco Control: Potential deaths averted in USA by replacing cigarettes with e-cigarettes

Source: Reuters, 2 October 2017

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USA: How investing in public health could cure many health care problems

Linda P. Fried, the Dean of Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, writes an op-ed discussing public health investing:

“Despite advances in medicine, U.S. health care spending grew to US$3.2 trillion in 2015, or 17.8% of the nation’s gross domestic product. To contain health care costs, the U.S. needs to invest in strengthening the public health system and reconsider approaches to making all Americans healthier.

“Efforts at smoking cessation should also be increased. The total economic cost of smoking in the United States is more than $300 billion a year in direct medical care and lost productivity.”

Source: Medical Xpress, 2 October 2017

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ASH Daily News comprises digests of published news on smoking-related topics. ASH is not responsible for the content of external websites. ASH does not necessarily endorse the material contained in this bulletin.