ASH Daily News 29 June 2017



  • North East: Smokefree legislation hailed a success as it nears 10th anniversary
  • The Solent: Smoking at its lowest level, new figures reveal
  • Bristol: The effect of smokefree legislation
  • Scotland: Leading charities critical of government dementia strategy
  • USA: Fewer cancer survivors breathing secondhand smoke

 

North East: Smokefree legislation hailed a success as it nears 10th anniversary

The 1st July marks 10 years since enclosed public places including pubs, restaurants, shops, and workplaces went smokefree. Since then, research has revealed the number of people smoking has fallen in the North East to 17.2% – the lowest rate on record.

Now, local tobacco control office Fresh has launched its Secondhand Smoke is Poison campaign – aimed at encouraging people who still smoke around children in the home to take it outside, or to quit.

Ailsa Rutter, director of Fresh, said: “Smokefree law was something that was not only badly needed but also wanted by the majority of people. The law was always about reducing high levels of exposure to smoke in workplaces and enclosed public spaces. It also raised awareness of the harm of smoking, and made people think about tobacco smoke in a different way.”

Source: Shields Gazette, 28 June 2017
Read Article

 

The Solent: Smoking at its lowest level, new figures reveal

Numbers of smokers in the Solent region have reached the lowest level in the last five years, according to new figures released this week. Figures show that just 13.6% of the population of Hampshire now smoke compared with 16.1% in 2012. In Southampton the figure fell from 21.3% to 17.8% over the same period.

Action on Smoking and Health’s director of policy, Hazel Cheeseman welcomed the figures describing the ban as the “most important piece of public health legislation in modern times”.

She added: “The number of people smoking continues to fall throughout the UK thanks to a decade of evidence-based policy, such as banning cigarette vending machines, putting tobacco out of sight in shops and most recently the introduction of standardised packaging. To continue this progress, we need the government to publish a new tobacco control plan as soon as possible so that nobody is left behind.”

Source: Daily Echo, 29 June 2017
Read Article

 

Bristol: The effect of smokefree legislation

According to Bristol City Council, an estimated 25% of the city’s population smoked in 2008, just after the law came into force, compared with the national average of 24% at the time. The number has fallen to 16.3%, according to Public Health England data from June 2016 – down again from 18.1% in 2015. However, this is still above the national average of 15.5%.

Bristol City Council’s cabinet member for public health, Asher Craig, said: “The ban on smoking in enclosed public spaces ten years ago was arguably the most important public health reform in decades. It has been hugely successful in encouraging people to quit and in Bristol we have seen smoking rates fall dramatically in the past 10 years.

Source: Bristol Post, 28 June 2017
Read Article

 

Scotland: Leading charities critical of government dementia strategy

Leading Scottish charities have warned there is no coherent strategy to reduce the number of people affected by dementia. The warning comes as the Scottish Government launched Scotland’s National Dementia Strategy 2017-2020, with a range of new commitments on dementia diagnosis and care.

There is strong evidence that lifestyle factors such as stopping smoking can significantly reduce the likelihood of developing dementia. However charities say there is no action plan in Scotland to inform the public of this link, and of the actions they can take to reduce their own dementia risk, as has happened in England and Wales.

Sheila Duffy, chief executive of ASH Scotland, said: “New commitments on dementia care are welcome. But dementia cases in Scotland will double over the next 25 years unless risk factors are addressed.”

Source: Third Force News, 28 June 2017
Read Article

 

USA: Fewer cancer survivors breathing secondhand smoke

Cancer survivors are less than half as likely to be exposed to secondhand smoke as they were a generation ago, a U.S. study suggests.

Even when they don’t smoke themselves, cancer patients who regularly breathe indoor air contaminated by tobacco smoke can have higher death rates and an increased risk of heart attack and strokes.

For the study, researchers analysed data on secondhand smoke exposure for 686 cancer survivors in nationally representative surveys done in two-year cycles from 1999 to 2012. Overall, only about 16% of participants were exposed to secondhand smoke by the end of the study period, down from roughly 40% at the beginning.

Source: Reuters, 28 June 2017
Read Article