ASH Daily News 27 November 2017



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UK

  • Wolverhampton: Health chiefs welcome Budget increase in tobacco duty
  • Bedfordshire: Smoking in bed ’causes serious fire’ at Maulden home
  • Scotland: New counterfeit goods campaign launched

International

  • European Commission backs proposals to ban smoking in French films
  • France: BNP Paribas Says It Will Stop Funding for Tobacco Industry
  • USA: A Forced ‘Corrective’ on Cigarettes

 

UK

Wolverhampton: Health chiefs welcome Budget increase in tobacco duty

Health chiefs in Wolverhampton have welcomed an increase in the duty on tobacco announced in the Budget this week.

Chancellor Philip Hammond’s first Autumn budget includes a pledge to raise duty on tobacco by 2% above the rate of inflation – in line with the escalator – with an additional 1% duty also being levied on hand-rolling tobacco.

Councillor Paul Sweet, the City of Wolverhampton Council’s Cabinet Member for Public Health and Wellbeing, said: “Although the percentage of adults smoking in the City of Wolverhampton has dropped dramatically in the last five years, rates are still above the national average and so we welcome anything which will encourage people not to smoke.

Source: Gorgeous FM, 24 November 2017
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Bedfordshire: Smoking in bed ’causes serious fire’ at Maulden home

A house fire was caused by someone smoking in bed, the fire service said.

Crew Commander Ross Mann said: “Please take care when smoking and always ensure you put out your cigarettes completely and in a safe receptacle.”

Source: BBC, 24 November 2017
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Scotland: New counterfeit goods campaign launched

The Scottish Anti-Illicit Trade Group’s is warning people against buying fake goods, especially as the Christmas season approaches.

Former Justice Secretary Kenny MacAskill, the chair of the group, said: “We see it now in e-cigarettes that can explode or catch fire. Buy from legitimate traders – they’ll keep you safe and we’ll all be better for it.”

Source: Central FM, 27 November 2017
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International

European Commission backs proposals to ban smoking in French films

A proposal to ban smoking with French films, made by senator Nadine Grelet-Certenais last week, has been supported by the European Commission.

Anca Paduraru, a European Commission spokesperson, said: “The Commission welcomes all measures taken by EU countries that deglamourize smoking, and reduce uptake, particularly amongst young people.”

Source: Verdict, 24 November 2017
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France: BNP Paribas Says It Will Stop Funding for Tobacco Industry

BNP Paribas SA will cease funding and advising tobacco companies, the latest financial firm to distance itself from the industry over health concerns.

The French bank will halt transactions and investments related to the sector and “progressively disengage” from relationships with tobacco clients, Laurence Pessez, the bank’s global head of corporate social responsibility, said in an interview in Paris. The decision applies to all types of products and services, though the bank will honor all contractual commitments, she said.

Source: Bloomberg, 24 November 2017
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USA: A Forced ‘Corrective’ on Cigarettes

In an opinion peice, Robert Proctor discusses the recent Federal District Court ruling that said cigarette makers had committed fraud and violated racketeering statutes in a decades-long conspiracy to deceive the public about the dangers of smoking.

Judge Kessler originally ordered each set of statements to begin with a notice that cigarette makers had “deliberately deceived the American public” about the dangers of smoking. But as a result of legal appeals by the companies, we will hear only that “A federal court has ordered” the companies to “make this statement about the health effects of smoking.”

What’s crucial to appreciate is that the corrective statements are not being issued voluntarily. And nowhere in the statements do the companies acknowledge the truth of what they are saying. In this sense, the statements are not really even admissions. Judge Kessler’s original order had required them to be prefaced by a clear “Here is the truth.” That requirement is now gone.

Source: New York Times, 24 November 2017
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