ASH Daily News 25 July 2017



  • Smokers who undergo a CT scan of their lungs are more likely to quit, study finds
  • Japan Tobacco International increases prices on premium lines by 25p
  • Australia: Psychiatrists want e-cigarettes ban lifted
  • USA: ‘Strong for surgery’ shows promise in reducing smoking rates for patients facing surgery
  • Parliamentary Question

 

Smokers who undergo a CT scan of their lungs are more likely to quit, study finds

Smokers who undergo a CT scan of their lungs are more likely to quit, new research suggests. Scientists said the findings of a study – looking at the effect of CT screening on smokers at high-risk of developing lung cancer – disputed the belief that a negative screening result offers a “licence to smoke”.

They suggested that engaging with lung screening can give smokers an opportunity to access smoking cessation support at a time when they are likely to be more receptive to offers of help.

Of the smokers who took part in the screening, 10% had successfully quit after two weeks, and 15% had quit after two years – both higher than rates in the control group.

See also:
BMJ: Impact of low-dose CT screening on smoking cessation among high-risk participants in the UK Lung Cancer Screening Trial

Source: The Independent, 24 July 2017
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Japan Tobacco International increases prices on premium lines by 25p

Japan Tobacco International (JTI) have increased the Recommended Retail Price (RRP) by 25p across their premium range.

Retail Express’ research shows 50% of retailers have moved away from selling at RRP. Of those selling above RRP, the average increase was 19p above. Some retailers feel the increased prices are an attempt by JTI to bring retailers back to RRP.

Karim Mawji from Young’s Newsagents near Ruislip commented: “They have seen retailers premium pricing, and they want that cake for themselves.”

Source: Better Retailing, 24 July 2017
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Australia: Psychiatrists want e-cigarettes ban lifted

Australia’s psychiatrists are urging the government to lift the ban on nicotine-containing electronic cigarettes, saying their mentally ill patients, many of whom are heavy smokers, could “significantly benefit” from the devices.

In a submission to the federal government’s e-cigarette inquiry, the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists (RANZCP) said the mentally ill were more likely to smoke and be heavy smokers, cutting their life expectancy by 20 years compared to the general population.

“E-cigarettes … provide a safer way to deliver nicotine to those who are unable to stop smoking, thereby minimising the harms associated with smoking tobacco and reducing some of the health disparities,” it said.

Source: Sydney Morning Herald, 20 July 2017
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USA: ‘Strong for surgery’ shows promise in reducing smoking rates for patients facing surgery

Cigarette smoking is one behaviour that can lead to poor postoperative outcomes in spine operations, a very common procedure.

A new American College of Surgeons (ACS) quality improvement programme, ‘Strong for Surgery’, that moves the concept of the checklist (used in operating rooms to reduce medical mishaps) out of the operating room and into the preoperative setting is linked to a two-thirds decrease in the rate of smoking in patients undergoing cervical and lumbar spine procedures, according to new findings presented yesterday at the 2017 ACS Quality and Safety Conference.

Source: EurekAlert, 24 July 2017
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Parliamentary Question

PQ: Tobacco Products Levy

Lord Beecham, Labour, Shadow Spokesperson (Housing), Shadow Spokesperson (Communities and Local Government), Shadow Spokesperson (Justice)
Her Majesty’s Government, in the light of the decision to introduce the Soft Drinks Industry Levy, whether they will review their decision in 2015 not to impose a levy on tobacco products; and if not, why not.

Lord Bates, The Minister of State, Department for International Development
The government has no current plans to review the decision not to introduce a tobacco levy. A levy would complicate the tax system, impose an administrative burden on businesses and HMRC and would create uncertainty for businesses and consumers.

The government remains committed to its objectives on tobacco policy; to raise revenue and protect public health. Budget 2017 increased tobacco duty rates by 2% above RPI inflation. In addition, a Minimum Excise Tax of £5.37 on a pack of 20 cigarettes was introduced on 20 May 2017, alongside standardised packaging and the new Tobacco Products Directive.

Source: Hansard, HL Deb, 24 July 2017
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