ASH Daily News 24 January 2018



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UK

  • Wales: Firefighters warn of safety after house fire

International

  • Indonesia: Vaping at risk of high taxation
  • USA: Vaping can support quitting smoking but should be monitored among kids
  • USA: Large study finds higher rates of early substance use among children with ADHD
  • Canada: Health coalition aims to reduce smoking rates in British Columbia

UK
Wales: Firefighters warns of fire safety after house fires

Following a spate of home fires, the fire service is highlighting the dangers and devastation that a fire in your home could have on your lives.

Head of Community Risk Reduction, Karen Jones advises: “Many accidental fires are avoidable if you are vigilant about home safety. Never leave lit candles unattended; ensure cigarettes are stubbed out and disposed of carefully; never smoke in bed.”

Source: Wales Online, 23 January 2018

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International
Indonesia: Vaping at risk of high taxation

Indonesia has one of the world’s highest smoking rates, with 65% of adult men smoking. Despite tobacco’s popularity, e-cigarette cafes have been popping up across Indonesia in recent years amid debate over their safety. In response, the Government said it will impose a 57% tax on non-tobacco alternatives starting this summer.

Hasbullah Thabrany, health expert and advisor for the National Commission on Tobacco Control, warned that while customs and excise law required the government to set taxes for such products, it was possible that authorities were using the levy to take sides with the tobacco industry.

Source: Daily Mail, 24 January 2018

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USA: Vaping can support quitting smoking but should be monitored among kids

Vaping may help adults quit but may encourage youths to start smoking said a report by the US National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. It is based on more than 800 peer-reviewed scientific studies on the health effects of electronic cigarettes. The report was compiled at the request of US Congress, amid a growing international debate over whether e-cigarettes are safe or harmful.

The report found “conclusive evidence” that substituting e-cigarettes for conventional cigarettes “reduces users’ exposure to many toxicants and carcinogens present in conventional cigarettes.”

“In some circumstances, such as their use by non-smoking adolescents and young adults, their adverse effects clearly warrant concern,” said David Eaton, chair of the committee that wrote the report and dean of the graduate school of the University of Washington, Seattle. But when adult smokers use e-cigarettes to quit smoking, “they offer an opportunity to reduce smoking-related illness,” he said.

See More:
National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine: Public Health Consequences of E-Cigarettes

Source: Medical Xpress, 23 January 2018

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USA: Large study finds higher rates of early substance use among children with ADHD

A new study found that children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) engaged in substance use at a younger age than those without ADHD and had a significantly higher prevalence of regular marijuana and cigarette use into adulthood. Led by researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, this large multi-site study also found that children diagnosed with ADHD had a faster progression of substance use during childhood and adolescence.

“There has been inconsistency across previous studies of children with ADHD and their risk of substance use in adolescence and in adulthood,” said Brooke Molina, professor of psychiatry, psychology and pediatrics, Pitt School of Medicine, and lead author of the study. “This study closely examined substance use by children with and without ADHD over a long period of time, considering that experimenting with some substances, such as alcohol and cigarettes, is typical after teens reach high-school age.”

Source: Medical Xpress, 23 January 2018

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Canada: Health coalition aims to reduce smoking rates in British Columbia

British Columbia’s Clean Air Coalition have released a new report focusing on reducing smoking rates in the province, with five key aims that they believe should have a positive impact. Formed of a partnership between the BC Lung Association, Heart & Stroke BC and the Canadian Cancer Society, the coalition are keen to target increasingly complex smoking patterns in the province.

Despite seeing smoking rates follow global trends by dropping, diseases related to tobacco still cause more than 16 deaths a day in British Columbia alone – a figure greater than drug and alcohol abuse, road traffic accidents, suicide and homicide combined.

See More:
Clean Air Coalition: First to 5% by 2035

Source: Odyssey, 23 January 2018

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ASH Daily News is a digest of published news on smoking-related topics. ASH is not responsible for the content of external websites. ASH does not necessarily endorse the material contained in this bulletin.