ASH Daily News 23 May 2017



  • BBC Radio 5 Live features segment on standardised packing
  • World No Tobacco Day: How to make it the day you stop smoking for good
  • USA: National study looks at tobacco advertising and susceptibility to use tobacco among youth
  • USA: New study suggests low muscle mass correlates with higher mortality in smokers

 

BBC Radio 5 Live features segment on standardised packing

ASH Director of Policy Hazel Cheeseman spoke on the Saturday Breakfast show about the benefits of standardised packaging:

“The purpose of the packaging changes is to protect young people from taking up smoking. We know that most people start smoking before the age of 18 and that the pack has been shown to be a form of advertising – the companies describe it as their silent salesman and their billboard – and that branding and advertising in one of the things that helps to recruit young people into smoking. So, removing the branding features and making the health warnings bigger and more prominent is intended to protect young people from taking up smoking.”

Editorial Note: Unfortunately this audio file is only available in the UK.

Source: BBC Radio 5 Live, 20th May 2017
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World No Tobacco Day: How to make it the day you stop smoking for good

On 31st May, around the world, millions of non-smokers, ex-smokers and smokers looking to quit their habit will come together in a show of unity against one of the most destructive substances afflicting the planet.

If you’re a smoker looking to make a real positive change to your health, there a number of methods and nicotine replacement therapies you can use to wean yourself off cigarettes for good.

Source: The Upcoming, 22nd May 2017
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USA: National study looks at tobacco advertising and susceptibility to use tobacco among youth

A new national study has reported that among 12- to 17-year-olds who have never used tobacco products, nearly half were considered receptive to tobacco marketing if they were able to recall or liked at least one advertisement. Receptivity to tobacco ads is associated with an increased susceptibility to smoking cigarettes in the future.

Led by researchers at University of California San Diego Moores Cancer Center and Dartmouth’s Norris Cotton Cancer Center, the researchers analyzed interviews with 10,751 adolescents who reported having never used any type of tobacco product. Risk to use a tobacco product in the future was the researchers’ main point of interest.

See Also:
Pediatrics: Receptivity to tobacco advertising and susceptibility to tobacco products

Source: Medical Xpress, 19th May 2017
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USA: New study suggests low muscle mass correlates with higher mortality in smokers

A new study set out to examine the hypothesis that a lower muscle mass correlates with higher mortality in smokers who do not have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The findings were presented at the American Thoracic Society 2017 conference.

The study’s lead author, Dr. Alejandro A. Diaz, instructor in medicine at Harvard University in Cambridge, explains the motivation for the research, saying, “Prior studies found that smoking resulted in muscle damage and loss of muscle, even in so- called healthy smokers. But whether that loss of muscle was associated with higher death rates was not known.”

Regardless of whether the smokers have COPD or not, smokers who have less chest muscle may be more likely to die prematurely, suggests the study.

Editorial Note: This study has been presented at a conference and has not yet been peer reviewed.

See Also:
Newswise: Muscle loss may predict mortality risk in smokers

Source: Medical News Today, 22nd May 2017
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