ASH Daily News 23 January 2018



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UK

  • According to e-cigarette retailer poll, 43% of Brits think vaping is better than smoking
  • This could be why your loved one refuses to try and quit smoking
  • Don’t let smoking myths stop you stubbing it out

International

  • USA: Study shows smokers who take the pill can cut their ovarian cancer risk by 66%
  • USA: New York once made it illegal for women to smoke in public

UK

According to e-cigarette retailer poll, 43% of Brits think vaping is better than smoking

Over 2 in 5 adults in Britain believe that electronic cigarettes are less harmful than traditional tobacco cigarettes and that vaping, overall, is much better for people’s health, according to the results of a new survey by YouGov on behalf of leading British online vaping retailer Electric Tobacconist.

In a poll of 2,134 GB adults, people were asked for their perceptions about e-cigarettes. Asked if they thought vaping was generally better for people’s health than smoking, 43% of respondents said yes. Just 5% held the view that vaping was worse for your health than smoking, while 31% believed that vaping has the same impact on people’s health as smoking. A total of 21% of respondents did not know whether vaping was better or worse than smoking.

Source: PR Newswire, 22 January 2018
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This could be why your loved one refuses to try and quit smoking

Smokers are refusing to kick the habit because they believe the damaging health effects won’t hit until later in life, a new study from the University of Milano-Bicocca and the University of Surrey suggests.

162 smokers and non-smokers were surveyed on their understanding of the onset of negative health conditions linked to smoking. The survey found that, on average, smokers thought both mild and severe smoking-related conditions would occur later in life than non-smokers.

The findings highlight a lack of understanding on the negative effects of smoking and how rapidly damage can be caused to the body, the researchers said.

Deborah Arnott, chief executive of health charity Action on Smoking and Health, told HuffPost UK: “For smokers who can’t quit it’s very stressful to worry about the damage their smoking does them. The easiest way to cope is to deny the risks. Not only do smokers think it takes longer for disease to develop than is actually the case, but they also think the risks of deadly diseases like cancer, respiratory and heart disease ever happening are exaggerated. The good news is that measures to reduce tobacco use like anti-smoking campaigns and warnings on the packs do work on many smokers and smoking rates continue to fall.”

Source: HuffPost UK, 22 January 2018
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Don’t let smoking myths stop you stubbing it out

Don’t let modern myths put you off trying to kick the smoking habit urges a leading consultant respiratory physician at Spire Hospital.

Dr. Muhammed Raashed addresses some of the myths abut quitting and details the truth about giving up cigarettes.

Source: Yorkshire Evening Post, 22 January 2018
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International

USA: Study shows smokers who take the pill can cut their ovarian cancer risk by 66%

Birth control pills greatly reduce the risk of developing ovarian cancer in smokers, according to a new study from the US National Cancer Institute. The long-term use of oral contraceptives was associated with a 40% reduced risk of developing ovarian cancer overall, and a 66% reduced risk in smokers, researchers found.

The study, published in JAMA Oncology, analyzed data collected from the NIH-AARP and Health Study which tracked more than 100,000 women using birth control pills from 1995 to 2011.

See More:
JAMA Oncology: Modification of the Associations Between Duration of Oral Contraceptive Use and Ovarian, Endometrial, Breast, and Colorectal Cancers

Source: Mail On Sunday, 22 January 2018
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USA: New York once made it illegal for women to smoke in public

Women in New York were once forbidden from lighting up in public under a controversial law at the turn of the 20th century. On 21 January 1908, Little Tim Sullivan – a politician who controlled New York’s East Side – proposed an ordinance that would make it illegal for women to smoke in public. The ordinance only lasted two weeks before being vetoed by the New York City council.

In 2002, a smoking ban branded the The Smoke Free Air Act which applied to all was introduced by then New York mayor Rudy Giuliani.

Source: International Business Times, 21 January 2018
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