ASH Daily News 22 August 2017



UK

  • 7-year old sponsored by vaping company for pageant
  • Scotland: SNP MSP criticised for taking hospitality from tobacco industry
  • London: Homerton Hospital plans to go smokefree

International

  • USA: Research shows peer influence doubles smoking risk for adolescents
  • USA: Smokers hospitalised for heart attacks often don’t get cessation drugs
  • USA: Many Americans still underestimate the risks of smoking, Stanford scholars say

 

UK
7-year old sponsored by vaping company for pageant

A seven-year-old pageant queen is now being sponsored by Vapour Love, an e-cigarettes company, in return for wearing branded company clothing.

Comment
Hazel Cheeseman, Director of Policy, ASH:
“It is completely irresponsible for a company that sells an age restricted product to promote their brand through a seven-year old girl. The ASA rules expressly forbid the use of children to market the sale of e-cigarettes and we have made a complaint that this breaches those rules.

E-cigarettes have helped many adults to quit smoking in this country and responsible marketing to smokers has played a part in that. However, by most people’s standards this goes well beyond the bounds of acceptability.”

See also:
ASH: Comment on Vapour Love sponsorship

Source: The Sun, 21 August 2017
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Scotland: SNP MSP criticised for taking hospitality from tobacco industry

An SNP MSP has been criticised for accepting hospitality from a multinational cigarette firm. Richard Lyle reportedly accepted over £800 in travel and accommodation from Philip Morris International (PMI).

Sheila Duffy, chief executive of Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) Scotland, said that taking guidance on health matters from tobacco companies is entirely at odds with the Scottish Government’s vision of a tobacco-free Scotland.

She said: “As a previous member of the Scottish Parliament’s Health and Sport Committee, Richard Lyle should know better than to go to a tobacco company for help and advice on stopping smoking.”

Source: Third Force news, 21 August 2017
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London: Homerton Hospital plans to go smokefree

Homerton Hospital is planning a total smoking ban on its premises – and in patients’ homes – by the end of the year. The ban will come into force in October – to coincide with the “Stoptober” stop smoking campaign. And any patients who receive hospital care at home will be asked not to smoke for an hour before staff arrive. The hospital in Homerton Row has smoking shelters at the moment, but should the ban be approved they’ll all be removed and anyone wishing to smoke will have to do so off-site.

Homerton Hospital chief nurse Sheila Adam has stated “It is right and proper that we should be discouraging smoking on NHS sites but at the same time we propose offering nicotine patches and support to patients who are smokers while in hospital”.

Source: Hackney Gazette, 22 August 2017
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International

USA: Research shows peer influence doubles smoking risk for adolescents

Research shows 90% of smokers pick up the habit by age 18, making adolescence a critical time for smoking-prevention efforts. Peer influence has long been known as a major risk factor for adolescent smoking, but findings have varied about how big the risk is or how this dynamic unfolds.

A new meta-analysis of 75 longitudinal teen smoking studies published in the journal Psychological Bulletin finds children aged 10 to 19 who have friends who smoke will be 4.3 times more likely to start smoking and continue smoking. It also found that peer influence is more powerful in collectivist cultures than in those where individualism is the norm. The study included data from 16 countries, including China, the UK, and the US.

See Also:
Psychological Bulletin: The Influence of Peer Behavior as a Function of Social and Cultural Closeness: A Meta-Analysis of Normative Influence on Adolescent Smoking Initiation and Continuation

Source: Medical Xpress, 18 August 2017
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USA: Smokers hospitalised for heart attacks often don’t get cessation drugs

Researchers examined data on almost 37,000 smokers hospitalised with heart disease and found only about 8,300, or 23%, received a prescription for a smoking-cessation aid during their hospital stay.

Previous research suggests that smoking cessation therapy in the hospital followed by additional help afterwards can significantly improve the odds that a quitting attempt will succeed.

White people in the study were also more likely to receive cessation aids than people of colour. When patients did get help, the nicotine patch was the most commonly used option.

Dr. Neal Benowitz, chief of clinical pharmacology at the University of California, stated “Patients should understand that smoking cessation medications are safe for cardiac patients”. Quitting smoking is the single most important thing a smoker can do to improve cardiovascular health.

See Also
JAMA International Medicine: Smoking cessation pharmacotherapy among smokers hospitalized for coronary heart disease

Source: Reuters, 21 August 2017
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USA: Many Americans still underestimate the risks of smoking, Stanford scholars say

After voluminous research studies, numerous lawsuits and millions of deaths linked to cigarettes, it might seem likely that Americans now properly understand the risks of smoking.

But they don’t, according to Stanford scholars Jon Krosnick and Neil Malhotra. Their recent study shows that despite most Americans recognizing that smoking can lead to life-threatening diseases, they don’t understand how much that risk increases.

See Also: Plos One: Perceptions of health risks of cigarette smoking: A new measure reveals widespread misunderstanding

Source: Stanford News, 21 August 2017
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ASH Daily News comprises digests of published news on smoking-related topics. ASH is not responsible for the content of external websites. ASH does not necessarily endorse the material contained in this bulletin.