ASH Daily News 2 October 2017



UK

  • UCL report says there’s never been a better time to stop smoking
  • Milton Keynes University Hospital goes smokefree
  • Dorset: Anti-litter group launches campaign as hundreds of cigarette butts picked up on streets
  • Norfolk: Support group launched to help pregnant smokers stop
  • Scotland: Millennials are shunning drugs, drink, smoking and sex

International

  • Mexico: Study shows birds use discarded cigarettes to fumigate their nests
  • Australia: Mining billionaire might sue tobacco industry on behalf of smokers
  • Indonesia: The epidemic of child smokers

UK
UCL report says there’s never been a better time to stop smoking

According to a report by University College London, for the first time, any smoker – no matter their background or job, sex, age or where they live – has virtually the same chance of quitting successfully as the next person.

The UCL report gives a number of reasons why there’s never been a better time to quit, including: better and more quitting aid options, with e-cigarettes now the most popular; more restrictions on smoking; the introduction of plain tobacco packaging; a stronger anti-smoking culture in England; and supportive stop smoking campaigns such as Stoptober.

Source: Dorset Echo, 29 September 2017

Read Article

 

Milton Keynes University Hospital goes smokefree

From October 1, in conjunction with Stoptober, Milton Keynes University Hospital will become an entirely smokefree site. Patients, visitors and staff will not be permitted to smoke anywhere on the hospital grounds, including the car parks.

Source: MKCitizen, 29 September 2017

Read Article

 

Dorset: Anti-litter group launches campaign as hundreds of cigarette butts picked up on streets

A new campaign is being launched across Dorset in an effort to encourage smokers to bin their butts. Organised by Litter Free Dorset, the campaign has targeted hotspot areas for cigarette butt littering.

Charlie Wild, Litter Free Dorset project officer, said, “We’re encouraging people to put butts in the bin or into personal ashtrays. Some people think cigarette filters are biodegradable, but they contain plastic which never disappears and a lot of chemicals. When they’re dropped or washed down street drains, they can flow directly into the river or sea.”

Source: Daily Echo, 2 October 2017

Read Article

 

Norfolk: Support group launched to help pregnant smokers stop

Smokefree Norfolk is launching a support group to help pregnant mums give up smoking called ‘Quit for Me’.

Dr Louise Smith, Director of Public Health for Norfolk, said: “We are working closely with others in the county to tackle the levels of smoking during pregnancy. We recognise that some mothers-to-be are reluctant to seek help to stop smoking because they’re worried that they may be harming their baby, but it’s still worth stopping even if you’ve smoked at the start of your pregnancy.

Source: Eastern Daily Press, 29 September 2017

Read Article

 

Scotland: Millennials are shunning drugs, drink, smoking and sex

Coined ‘New Puritanism’, the number of Millennials who indulge in sex, drugs, drinking and smoking has fallen to a record low, while their Generation X parents continue partying well into middle age.

The latest Scottish Schools Adolescent Lifestyle And Substance Use Survey suggests the downward trend in young people using drink and drugs is likely to continue.

Read More:
Scottish Government: Scottish Schools Adolescent Lifestyle And Substance Use Survey

Source: The Herald, 1 October 2017

Read Article

 

International
Mexico: Study shows birds use discarded cigarettes to fumigate their nests

A study published in Avian Biology has demonstrated that cigarette butts are being woven into bird nests by design, not by accident.

The study looked at the habits of finches and confirmed the theory that the birds collect cigarette butts deliberately to keep ticks at bay and improve the survival of their young.

See more:
Avian Biology: An experimental demonstration that house finches add cigarette butts in response to ectoparasites

Source: The Economist, 30 September 2017

Read Article

 

Australia: Mining billionaire might sue tobacco industry on behalf of smokers

Businessman and philanthropist Andrew Forrest had reportedly started seeking advice on an impending lawsuit.

Mr Forrest’s efforts follows a Canadian landmark lawsuit which had successfully managed to seek $15.6 billion in damages for more than one million smokers in 2015, the Saturday Telegraph reports.

Source: This is Money, 30 September 2017

Read Article

 

Indonesia: The epidemic of child smokers

Six years ago, Aldi Suganda – also known as Aldi Rizal – was a 2-year-old addicted to cigarettes, smoking multiple packs a day. After a year of rehabilitation with a child psychologist, Aldi is now healthy.

However, there are an estimated 267,000 children who use tobacco products every day. The Ministry of Health is currently working with other ministries and the World Health Organization to tackle the problem of cigarettes. Dr. Seoto Mulyadi, the doctor who treated Aldi, says: “As long as cigarette ads are spread out massively on TV, radio, newspapers, outdoor signage, everywhere, the problem of child smokers will get worse and worse.”

Source: Evo News, 29 September 2017

Read Article

 

ASH Daily News comprises digests of published news on smoking-related topics. ASH is not responsible for the content of external websites. ASH does not necessarily endorse the material contained in this bulletin.