ASH Daily News 19 July 2017



  • Government lays out ‘vision for smoke-free generation’, pledging to slash smoking rates to 12% by 2022
  • Midwives ‘need more training’ to address smoking in pregnancy
  • A new study examines chemicals in hookah tobacco smoke
  • USA: Warnings on US cigarette packs not as effective as those in other countries
  • India: Philip Morris takes aim at young people in India, and health officials are fuming
  • India: Doctors blame a rise in heart attacks among Delhi’s young people on smoking
  • Turkey tightens rules for manufacturing and labelling cigarette papers

 

Government lays out ‘vision for smoke-free generation’, pledging to slash smoking rates to 12% by 2022

Officials hope that by slashing the number of people who smoke by nearly a quarter in five years, they can entirely stamp out the habit – still the leading cause of preventable illness and death in the UK – in the coming decades.

“Our vision is nothing less than to create a smoke-free generation,” said Steve Brine, parliamentary under-secretary for public health.

The charity Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) said that a new generation of non-smokers could be achieved by as soon as 2030, if smoking rates continue to decline nationally.

Deborah Arnott, ASH Chief Executive, said that at a time of government cuts to public spending, money must be allocated to reach that goal. “Funding must be found if the government is to achieve its vision of a ‘smoke-free generation’.”

See More:
Yahoo! News: The government wants to stop two million Britons smoking in the next five years

The Sun: Major smoking crackdown launched as Government urges millions to switch to e-cigarettes; Campaigners ASH predict the UK could be smoke free – with less than one in 20 lighting up – by 2030

Mirror: Government wants to make Britain smoke free by 2022 as it unveils plan to slash the number of us lighting up

The Times: Let workers vape in office, Government plan suggests

Source: Evening Standard, 18 July 2017

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Midwives ‘need more training’ to address smoking in pregnancy

Midwives need more consistent training in how to communicate the harms of smoking to pregnant women, according to a new report.

They also need more training in the use carbon monoxide monitors, said the report, published by Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) on behalf of the Smoking in Pregnancy Challenge Group.

The report, titled “Smoke-free Skills: An assessment of maternity workforce training”, outlines the training that midwives and obstetricians currently get to tackle smoking in pregnancy and highlights what further training is needed.

Report author Misha Moore says “Staff are clear on the risks of smoking but not all are quite so clear on how they could help women to stop.”

See More:
ASH: Smokefree Skills: An assessment of maternity workforce training

Source: Nursing Times, 18 July 2017

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A new study examines chemicals in hookah tobacco smoke

A new study out of San Diego State University’s Center for Behavioral Epidemiology and Community Health shows that burning hookah tobacco creates a dangerous byproduct: the chemical compound acrolein. Lead author Nada Kassem, a research scientist in SDSU’s Graduate School of Public Health, and her collaborators found that the use of tobacco in a hookah exposes smokers and non-smokers to potentially dangerous levels of the respiratory irritant that is believed to cause cancer and heart disease.

See More:
Oxford Academic: Acrolein Exposure in Hookah Smokers and Non-Smokers Exposed to Hookah Tobacco Secondhand Smoke: Implications for Regulating Hookah Tobacco Products

Source: Medical Xpress, 18 July 2017

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USA: Warnings on US cigarette packs not as effective as those in other countries

Cigarette smoke contains more than 9,000 chemicals, including more than 60 carcinogens. According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, there are 93 harmful and potentially harmful chemicals found in tobacco products.

But, when asked, adults in the U.S. can name only a few, such as tar and nicotine. A new study found that smokers’ knowledge of toxic chemicals described on each country’s warnings significantly increased between 2012 and 2014 in all countries but the U.S., after the countries added information about toxic chemicals to cigarette packs.

See More:

Sage Journals: Does Adding Information on Toxic Constituents to Cigarette Pack Warnings Increase Smokers’ Perceptions About the Health Risks of Smoking? A Longitudinal Study in Australia, Canada, Mexico, and the United States

Source: The Conversation, 18 July 2017

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India: Philip Morris takes aim at young people in India, and health officials are fuming

Indian government officials say Philip Morris is using methods that flout the nation’s tobacco-control regulations. These include tobacco shop displays as well as the free distribution of Marlboro – the world’s best-selling cigarette brand – at nightclubs and bars frequented by young people.

In internal documents, Philip Morris International is explicit about targeting the country’s youth. A key goal is “winning the hearts and minds of LA-24,” those between legal age, 18, and 24, according to one slide in a 2015 commercial review presentation.

The company’s goal is to make sure that “every adult Indian smoker should be able to buy Marlboro within walking distance,” according to another 2015 strategy document.

Source: Reuters, 18 July 2017

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India: Doctors blame a rise in heart attacks among Delhi’s young people on smoking

Doctors say that over two decades ago, there were more patients between the age group of 50-60 compared to today, when the number of younger patients has increased.

Experts say that sedentary lifestyles, smoking, stress and lack of physical exercise are common reasons for heart related ailments.

Dr Gautam Sharma, professor of cardiology department at AIIMS told Mail Today: ‘Yes, it true that more and more younger patients are turning up to the OPD for cardiology treatment. When we ask them about their lifestyle — smoking and tobacco chewing habits are very common.

Source: Mail Online India, 18 July 2017

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Turkey tightens rules for manufacturing and labelling cigarette papers

Turkey has tightened manufacturing rules for cigarette papers, as well as prohibited adding sugars, flavouring and colouring during production. It has also updated the minimum requirements for health warnings on packages for cigarette papers. Most notably, the health warning on cigarette papers must now cover at least 65% of the package’s most visible side.

Source: Mondaq, 18 July 2017

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