ASH Daily News 18 July 2017



  • New Tobacco Control Plan published
  • New ASH report focuses on need to reduce smoking in pregnancy
  • Big tobacco bullies the global south; trade deals are their biggest weapon
  • The scandal of big tobacco’s behaviour in the developing world
  • Scotland: Prisons to be smoke-free by 2018

 

New Tobacco Control Plan published

The new Tobacco Control Plan aims to slash smoking rates from 15.5% to 12% of the population by 2022, paving the way to a smoke-free generation.

If national smoking rates continue to fall, this generation of non-smokers could be achieved by 2030, the charity Action on Smoking and Health says.

Health officials says smoking currently kills 200 people a day in England.

See More:
Department of Health: Towards a smokefree generation: A Tobacco Control Plan for England

ASH: ASH welcomes new Tobacco Control Plan for England: Funding needed for it to succeed

Source: BBC, 18 July 2017

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New ASH report focuses on need to reduce smoking in pregnancy

The report has been published by Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) on behalf of the Smoking in Pregnancy Challenge Group and is being launched in Parliament today at a joint event between the All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on baby loss and the APPG on smoking and health.

Report author Dr Misha Moore, a doctor in both public health and obstetrics, said: “Throughout this process, people would tell me the importance of reducing smoking in pregnancy ‘goes without saying’. But leaving things unsaid appears to be just the problem.The majority of staff are clear on the risks of smoking, but not all are quite so clear on how they could help women to stop. Simple, low-cost, training delivered by every trust in the country could go a long way to addressing this issue.”

See More:
ASH: Smokefree Skills: An assessment of maternity workforce training

Source: Northumberland Gazette, 18 July 2017

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Big tobacco bullies the global south; trade deals are their biggest weapon

British American Tobacco, in an effort to keep Kenyans breathing their smoke, fought the regulations on the grounds that they “constitute an unjustifiable barrier to international trade”.

In fact, big tobacco has a long history of using trade and investment rules to force their products on markets in the global south and attack laws and threaten lawmakers that attempt to control tobacco use.

The problem goes beyond big tobacco. Big oil, big pharma and big mining follow the same playbook, launching investment arbitration cases to defend their business models from governments that would regulate to protect public health, the local environment or the climate.

Source: The Guardian, 17 July 2017

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The scandal of big tobacco’s behaviour in the developing world

Tobacco experts and policy makers respond to the Guardian’s investigative series on cigarette companies’ efforts to squash anti-smoking measures in the poorest countries.

Source: The Guardian, 17 July 2017

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Scotland: Prisons to be smoke-free by 2018

The Scottish Prison Service says it intends to make all jails north of the border “smoke-free” by November 2018. The move is designed to tackle the “unacceptably high risk” posed to the health of prisoners, staff and visitors by passive smoking.

Source: East Lothian Courier, 17 July 2017

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