ASH Daily News 16 November 2017



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UK

  • Leeds: Plan for stricter dog rules and smoking ban at play areas
  • Fenland Council: Littering cigarettes could cost £75

International

  • Denmark: Study shows heavy drinking and smoking linked to visible signs of ageing
  • USA: Tips for mothers-to-be on substance abuse
  • USA: Editorial: Use big tobacco’s Nov 26 corrective statements to reduce smoking
  • Israel: Study show parents are exposing their children more lethal secondhand smoke than they think, study shows

UK
Leeds: Plan for smoking ban at play areas

People are being urged to take part in a consultation about whether to create stricter dog control rules and ban smoking at play areas in Leeds.

Coun Lucinda Yeadon, the Leeds City Council member responsible for environment and sustainability, said: “We want parks in Leeds to be clean and accessible for all of our residents and we hope that through this consultation, we will be able to improve in these areas.”

Views are also being sought on whether smoking should be banned in children’s play areas, with the aim of stopping youngsters being exposed to the habit. Smoking bans currently only apply to indoor public spaces. The consultation will run until the Friday, December 15.

Source: Yorkshire Evening Post, 15 November 2017
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Fenland Council: Littering cigarettes could cost £75

Fenland Council has hired an enforcement company to deter littering and hand out fixed penalty fines.

This summer the team from Kingdom Services issued over 180 penalty notices in just one month in Wisbech. With offences likely to cost £75 the council is hoping it will prove a deterrent.

Councillor Peter Murphy said: “The public overwhelmingly supported action against the irresponsible people who commit these environmental crimes”.

Source: Wisbech Standard, 15 November 2017
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International
Denmark: Study shows heavy drinking and smoking linked to visible signs of ageing

Heavy drinking and smoking are linked to visible signs of physical ageing, and looking older than one’s years, suggests research from the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

The study bases its findings on information from more than 11,500 adults, whose heart health and visible ageing signs were tracked for an average of 11.5 years as part of the Copenhagen City Heart Study.

This study, which began in 1976, has been monitoring a random sample of Danish people over the age of 20 living in the Copenhagen area in 1981-3, 1991-4, and in 2001-3.

Source: Rochdale Online, 16 November 2017
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USA: Tips for mothers-to-be on smoking

Obstetrician-gynecologist Dr. Kecia Gaither offers tips on minimizing risks associated with substance abuse in pregnancy.

“Cigarette smoke contains 4,000 chemicals, the most harmful of which during pregnancy are nicotine and carbon monoxide. These pass from the mother’s bloodstream through the placenta to the developing baby, where they work together to reduce the baby’s supply of oxygen. As few as one or two cigarettes a day will both reduce the amount of oxygen in the red blood cells and narrow the blood vessels, making it harder for the cells carrying oxygen and nutrients to reach the baby. Smoking during pregnancy dramatically increases the risk of stillbirth, premature delivery, and low birth weight.

These babies often have underdeveloped lungs and continuing breathing problems. They are at greater risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and of developing asthma.”

Source: BioPortfolio, 15 November 2017
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USA: Editorial: Use big tobacco’s Nov 26 corrective statements to reduce smoking

The court-ordered publication of “corrective statements” by major U.S. tobacco companies later this month should serve as a reminder that tobacco addiction remains a major health problem in the country and that big tobacco has a long history of marketing practices aimed at hooking a new generation on a lethal product, according to an editorial published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

Ruling in 2006 on a lawsuit brought by the U.S. Department of Justice, U.S. District Judge Gladys Kessler wrote, “Defendants have marketed and sold their lethal produce with zeal, with deception, with a single-minded focus on their financial success, and without regard for the human tragedy or social costs that success exacted.”

As part of her landmark decision, Judge Kessler ordered the major tobacco companies to make corrective statements about the adverse health effects of smoking; the addictiveness of smoking and nicotine; the manipulation of cigarette ingredients to maximize nicotine delivery; the lack of health benefits from smoking light, mild, natural and other cigarette descriptors that imply less harm; and the dangers of secondhand smoke.

See Also:
Annals of the American Thoracic Society: Corrective Statements from the Tobacco Industry: More Evidence for Why We Need Effective Tobacco Control

Source: Science Magazine, 15 November 2017
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Israel: Study show parents are exposing their children more lethal secondhand smoke than they think, study shows

Children may be exposed to far more secondhand smoke than their parents realize, new research from American Friends of Tel Aviv University suggests. Parents largely rely on seeing smokers, smoke, or smelling the fumes to determine whether or not their children’s are in a dangerously smokey environment, according to the study authors.

The researchers interviewed 65 parents who smoked and had young children in Israel, and found that most parents thought that they could do things like smoke in the car with the windows down without it affecting their children’s health.

Tests of their children, however, showed that children whose parents smoked in the car or by open windows with them had twice as many markers of nicotine exposure as normal samples.

Source: Mail on Sunday, 15 November 2017
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ASH Daily News comprises digests of published news on smoking-related topics. ASH is not responsible for the content of external websites. ASH does not necessarily endorse the material contained in this bulletin.