ASH Daily News 15 June 2017



  • Drop in violence associated with smokefree policy at psychiatric hospital
  • Northern Ireland child health ‘among worst in Western Europe’
  • Yorkshire: Sharp drop in people giving up smoking in York
  • USA: LGBT Community among the hardest hit by smoking

 

Drop in violence associated with smokefree policy at psychiatric hospital

New King’s College London research reveals a 39% drop in physical assaults – both between patients and towards staff – following the introduction of a smokefree policy at the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust (SLaM).

Published today in The Lancet Psychiatry, the study has important implications for the introduction of smokefree policies, not only in psychiatric hospitals but also in other institutions such as prisons.

Smoking within psychiatric hospitals has long been a cultural norm, and is a major reason why people with mental health problems die 15-20 years earlier than the general population. Despite this, smokefree policies have previously been hampered by concerns, especially from hospital staff, that physical violence will increase.

See also: The Lancet: Effect of implementation of a smoke-free policy on physical violence in a psychiatric inpatient setting: an interrupted time series analysis.

Source: King’s College London, 15 June 2017
Read Article

 

Northern Ireland child health ‘among worst in Western Europe’

The health of children in Northern Ireland is among the worst in Western Europe, according to a new report.

The widening gap between rich and poor is putting the health of Northern Ireland’s children at risk, says the report from the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH).

The report makes a number of recommendations aimed at improving child health across Northern Ireland, including a ban on smoking in cars when children are present. This is currently already in place across the other UK nations and the Republic of Ireland, and the NI Assembly voted in favour of a ban more than a year ago.

Source: BBC, 15 June 2017
Read Article

 

Yorkshire: Sharp drop in people giving up smoking in York

The number of people quitting smoking with the help of public health workers in York has fallen sharply in the last year.

In spring last year the amount of free help available for people who want to stop smoking was cut for all but a few groups, as City of York Council took over responsibility from the NHS and tried to balance the books.

A report by assistant public health director Fiona Phillips shows the number of people who used the service and were still smokefree four weeks in fell from 366 to 2015/16 to just 33 in 2016/17 – a drop of more than 90% in just one year. And between 2014/15 and last year, that figure for pregnant women fell from 30 to just seven.

Source: York Press, 15 June 2017
Read Article

 

USA: LGBT Community among the hardest hit by smoking

It is not an accident that smoking rates among lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender youth are twice the rate for the general population. For decades LGBT communities have been disproportionately targeted by the tobacco industry with aggressive advertising and promotional efforts.

The tobacco industry has made efforts to appeal to LGBT consumers through things like targeted advertisements in LGBT press, cigarette giveaways and free tobacco industry merchandise.

Though youth smoking rates overall are down to 6%, smoking rates among LGB youth are estimated to be considerably higher than those among youth in general, based on an analysis of data from 1987 to 2000. More than twice as many LGB students in grades nine through 12 have smoked a cigarette before the age of 13, compared to their heterosexual peers. LGB students also smoke more frequently.

Source: PR Newswire, 14 June 2017
Read Article