ASH Daily News 15 December 2017



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International

  • Australia: Government assessment finds that nine out of ten homes in New South Wales are now smokefree
  • Australia: Almost 40% of cancer deaths preventable
  • Indonesia: Tobacco industry still holds grip on policy making
  • Australia: Research shows increase in number of young smokers using rolling tobacco

Link of the Week

  • Latest findings from the National Chronic Obstructive Pulminary Disease (COPD) Audit

International

Australia: Government assessment finds that nine out of ten homes in New South Wales are now smokefree

The Tobacco Snapshot 2017, a government led assessment of smoking and tobacco use, has found that nine out of ten homes in New South Wales (NSW) are now smokefree.

Between the years 1997 and 2016, the rate of smoking among adults in NSW has fallen dramatically, from almost 25% to 15%. The rate of smoking among Aboriginal populations also saw a small decline, dropping from 43% in 2008 to 40% in 2016.

The assessment found that anti-smoking campaigns, legislation and support programmes had all contributed to the decline in smoking rates, along with compliance regulations that have been imposed upon the tobacco industry.

Source: Mail Online, 14 December 2017

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Australia: Almost 40% of cancer deaths preventable

An Australian study, commissioned by QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute has found that almost 40% of cancer deaths are preventable and result mainly from modifiable lifestyle changes.

The study, which was published in the International Journal of Cancer, found that “modifiable factors” were responsible for 41% of cancer deaths amongst Australian men and 34% of cancer deaths amongst Australian women.

Professor David Whiteman, head of QIMR Berghofers Cancer Control Group, added: “By far the biggest preventable cause of cancer deaths in Australia is tobacco smoke. Cancer caused by smoking and passive smoking killed 9,921 people in 2013 and accounted for 23 per cent of all cancer deaths”.

Source: India Today, 14 December 2017

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Indonesia: Tobacco industry still holds grip on policy making

Antismoking campaigners in Indonesia are still struggling to contend with the influence that the tobacco industry holds over policy making.

The tobacco industry has continually deployed lobby groups to stifle control measures across Southeast Asia. This is especially so in Indonesia, Vietnam and Myanmar, according to the Tobacco Industry Interference Index released last month by Southeast Asia Tobacco Control Alliance (SEATCA). The index assesses how countries are adhering to guidelines set by the World Health Organisation (WHO) to prevent the tobacco industry from interfering with public health policies.

Indonesia, where nearly 65% of men and more than 20% of youth aged 13-15 smoke, is the only WHO member in Southeast Asia that has not ratified the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC), a set of universal standards to limit the sale, distribution and advertising of tobacco.

“A number of policies in Indonesia were influenced by the tobacco industry. Indonesia is easily controlled by Big Tobacco because we haven’t ratified the FCTC,” said Prijo Sidipratomo, chairman of the National Commission on Tobacco Control.

Source: The South China Morning Post, 10 December 2017

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Australia: Research shows increase in number of young smokers using rolling tobacco

Research from Cancer Council Victoria and Quit Victoria has found that there has been an increase in the number of smokers using rolling tobacco.

The survey of 4,000 people found that 43% of those aged 18-29 used rolling tobacco for smoking. This is an increase of 14% on the figures from 2001, when 29% of young people reported that they rolled their own cigarettes. The survey also revealed that almost 50% of these young people had the false perception that hand rolled cigarettes were less harmful to health. The survey also then called for young smokers to be better educated on the harmful effects of smoking in any form.

The director of Quit Victoria, Dr Sarah White, commented: “It’s really alarming that close to half of roll-your-own tobacco users believe roll-your-own tobacco is less harmful than traditional cigarettes. There is a perception among smokers that these products are more ‘natural’ and don’t contain additives – but this couldn’t be further from the truth. Tobacco companies use similar additives in loose tobacco as they do in cigarettes”.

Source: Mail Online, 15 December 2017

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Link of the Week
Latest findings from the National Chronic Obstructive Pulminary Disease (COPD) Audit

This week’s link is a downloadable PDF file that presents the data from the National COPD Audit Programme’s Welsh primary care audit, covering April 2015 to March 2017.

It presents case studies, key findings that have been extracted from the data and clear recommendations for primary carers, people with or worried about COPD and respiratory specialists.

 

Access link

 

 

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