ASH Daily News 13 June 2017



  • USA: E-cigarettes less addictive than cigarettes, PATH study shows
  • USA: New method developed to map DNA damage caused by tobacco
  • USA: New study looks at tobacco-free policies at worksites in Kansas
  • Romania: Survey shows most Romanians agree with law banning smoking in enclosed public spaces

 

USA: E-cigarettes less addictive than cigarettes, PATH study shows

People who regularly use electronic cigarettes are less dependent on their product than those who regularly use traditional cigarettes, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.

To compare e-cigarette and cigarette dependence, researchers analysed responses to surveys taken in the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) study. In these responses, they looked for daily or almost-daily users of either e-cigarettes or cigarettes.

Out of 32,320 who answered the survey, 3,586 fit the study criteria. Among those, about 5% exclusively used e-cigarettes and about 95% exclusively smoked cigarettes. Of the e-cigarette users, 93% once regularly smoked cigarettes and about 7% experimented with cigarette smoking.

Source: Scienmag, 12 June 2017
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USA: New method developed to map DNA damage caused by tobacco

Scientists have known for decades that smoking cigarettes causes DNA damage, which leads to lung cancer. Now, for the first time, UNC School of Medicine scientists created a method for effectively mapping that DNA damage at high resolution across the genome.

The innovation comes from the laboratory of Nobel laureate Aziz Sancar, MD, PhD, the Sarah Graham Kenan Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics at UNC’s School of Medicine. In a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Sancar and his team developed a useful technique for mapping sites on the genome that are undergoing repair following a common type of DNA damage. They then used that technique to map all damage caused by one major chemical carcinogen called benzo[α]pyrene.

Maps like these will help scientists better understand how smoking-induced cancers originate, why some people are more vulnerable or resistant to cancers, and how these cancers might be prevented. Sancar also hopes that providing such stark and specific evidence of smoking’s harm at the cellular level might induce some smokers to kick the habit.

Source: Bioengineer, 12 June 2017
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USA: New study looks at tobacco-free policies at worksites in Kansas

The study, published in BMC, sought to examine the relationship between tobacco-free policies at worksites to worksite demographics such as company size and geographic location. It found that rural and smaller employers are less likely to have tobacco-free policies than their urban and large counterparts.

Source: BMC Public Health, 12 June 2017
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Romania: Survey shows most Romanians agree with law banning smoking in enclosed public spaces

One year after the smoking ban entered into force in Romania, 83% of Romanians agree with the new regulations, according to a recent study on the level of support for policies aimed at reducing tobacco consumption in Romania.

The study was conducted in March-April 2017 by Mercury Research, at the request of the local anti-smoking initiative group “2035 Without Tobacco”. A total of 1,000 people participated in the study.

Source: Romania-Insider, 12 June 2017
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