ASH Daily News 13 April 2017



  • Flavoured e-cigarettes should be banned to stop enticing kids to try them, health experts urge
  • Florida, USA: Tobacco Companies ordered to pay $35M in ‘Engle’ verdict
  • East Midlands: Taxi Driver fined £230 for smoking under Heath Act 2006 rules

 

Flavoured e-cigarettes should be banned to stop enticing kids to try them, health experts urge

Flavoured e-cigarettes should be banned to stop young kids developing a taste for the potentially dangerous devices, health experts have urged.

Hazel Cheeseman, director of policy for ASH, argued flavours play “an important part” in making e-cigs appealing to people who want to quit smoking.

She added: “New EU regulations require reporting on the content of e-liquids and give the Government the power to prohibit flavours if they are shown to be harmful. This balanced approach both protects children and maintains the availability of attractive alternatives for adults who smoke.”

Ashley Gould, consultant lead for tobacco control at Public Health Wales, told The Sun Online: “The use of nicotine in any form by children and young people is not safe. It can cause addiction and can harm the developing adolescent brain… And ‘confectionery-like’ flavours of e-liquid should not be permitted to reduce the appeal of (e-cigarettes) to children and young people.”

Source: The Scottish Sun, 12th April 2017
Read Article

 
Florida, USA: Tobacco Companies ordered to pay $35M in ‘Engle’ verdict

Pointing to “intentional” wrongdoing in the past by the tobacco industry, a state appeals court has ordered two cigarette makers to pay a full $35 million jury award in a case involving a man who had to undergo two double-lung transplants.

A three-judge panel of the 2nd District Court of Appeal overturned a lower-court decision that would have reduced the payment because of a finding that former smoker Richard Boatright was partially at fault. Boatright began smoking at age 12 and developed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at age 39, the ruling said. In a lawsuit filed in Polk County, a jury awarded $15 million in compensatory damages to Boatright and his wife and $20 million in punitive damages. A judge, however, reduced the compensatory damages to a total of $12.75 million because of what is known as “comparative” fault involving Boatright’s smoking. Almost all of the verdict was against cigarette maker Philip Morris USA, with a small portion against Liggett Group, LLC.

The case is one of the thousands in Florida that are known as “Engle progeny” cases. Such cases are linked to a 2006 Supreme Court ruling that established critical findings about the health dangers of smoking and misrepresentation by cigarette makers.

See Also:
Law360.com: Philip Morris hit with $35M Engle Tobacco Verdict
Orlando Sentinel: Tobacco companies ordered to pay $35M in Florida case

Source: CBS Local News, 13th April 2017
Read Article

 
East Midlands: Taxi Driver fined £230 for smoking under Heath Act 2006 rules

A taxi driver has been forced to pay over seven times the cost of an initial fixed penalty notice after refusing the fine and being found guilty of smoking in his cab on a Grantham street. Kevin Doughty, 47, was witnessed with the cigarette lit in his Ford Mondeo on St Peter’s Hill by a South Kesteven District Council officer on August 31 last year.

Instead of paying the £30 fixed penalty notice within 15 days of it being served, he was instead convicted and left with a bill of £230 at Lincoln Magistrates’ Court on April 5. Having pleaded not guilty to the offence at an earlier hearing, the court heard Doughty claimed that he was vaping an e-cigarette in the vehicle at the time and whilst not on duty.

Smoking a tobacco cigarette in any taxi or private hire vehicle contravenes rules that were amended in August 2015, where drivers must not smoke in their vehicles even when they do not have passengers or if using the taxi when off duty. This is to avoid tobacco smoke being present in the air or absorbed into soft furnishings in any vehicle and being passed on to passengers.

Source: Grantham Journal, 12th April 2017
Read Article