ASH Daily News 12 December 2017



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UK

  • CRUK study shows green cigarettes could stop young people smoking
  • New Smokefree resources from Public Health England
  • How social smoking actually affects your body

International

  • Australia: Researchers show nicotine replacement is safer for pregnant women than smoking
  • Austria stubs out looming smoking ban in name of ‘freedom’
  • Sweden: Smoking reduces increase in life expectancy for less educated women

Parliamentary Activity

  • Parliamentary Questions

UK
CRUK study shows green cigarettes could stop young people smoking

Printing health warnings on individual cigarettes and changing their colour from white to green could put people off smoking, a study by Cancer Research UK has suggested.

In the study, 16 to 24-year-olds were shown an image of a normal cigarette with a white paper and imitation cork filter. They were then shown a cigarette with “smoking kills” printed on it and another made to look unattractive by making it green. Both smokers and non-smokers found the altered cigarettes significantly less appealing and said they would be less likely to try them. Smokers were more likely to be put off by the altered cigarettes than non-smokers.

See More:
Nicotine & Tobacco Research: The response of young adult smokers and non-smokers in the United Kingdom to dissuasive cigarettes: An online survey

Source: The Times, 12 December 2017

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New Smokefree resources from Public Health England

This January, Public Health England will be running a health harms campaign to encourage smokers to quit in the new year. The national campaign launches on 29 December 2017 and will include new TV ad to highlight the harms of smoking and urge smokers to quit.

If you would like to support the Smokefree campaign this January, you can order a printed toolkit from Pharmacy Order Line calling the number: 03001231019. The toolkit includes an activation brief, two A4 posters, 50 A5 leaflets and leaflet dispenser.

Source: Royal Pharmaceutical Society, 11 December 2017

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How social smoking actually affects your body

“Social smoking is a misnomer,” says Dr Richard Russell, Consultant Respiratory Physician and medical advisor to the British Lung Foundation. “Whether you smoke socially or not is not the point. It’s the toxic chemicals you are inhaling. Even occasional smoking puts your health at risk – the only safe level of smoking is nothing at all.”

Source: MSN, 11 December 2017

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International
Australia: Researchers show nicotine replacement is safer for pregnant women than smoking

Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) is safer than smoking and should be recommended to more pregnant patients who are not able to quit on their own, according to a new review study in the Medical Journal of Australia.

“Smoking during pregnancy is the most significant, preventable risk factor for poor maternal and infant health outcomes,” said Dr. Yael Bar-Zeev, head of the BGU Center for Smoking Cessation and Prevention.

See More:
The Medical Journal of Australia: Nicotine replacement therapy for smoking cessation in pregnancy

Source: Medical Xpress, 11 December 2017

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Austria stubs out looming smoking ban in name of ‘freedom’

Austria’s far-right Freedom Party has announced that a planned ban on smoking in all bars and restaurants that was due to come into force in 2018 will be scrapped.

Party chief Heinz-Christian Strache said the reversal was agreed in ongoing talks to form a coalition with the conservative People’s Party (OVP) following elections in October.

“Overturning the total ban on smoking in the restaurant industry is an enormous step backwards on health policy,” said health minister Pamela Rendi-Wagner of the Social Democrats, who will go into opposition once a coalition deal is reached.

Source: The Guardian, 12 December 2017

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Sweden: Smoking reduces increase in life expectancy for less educated women

Life expectancy in Sweden has risen steadily during the last few decades for most groups. One exception is women whose highest educational level is compulsory school. This is mostly because of smoking, says a new study.

The study is based on data from the registries of causes of death and education for all Swedes who were 30-74 years old between 1991 and 2008. The research shows that inequality in longevity has increased among women during this period.

The statistics show that anticipated life expectancy among women with only a primary education increased by a little over a month between 1991 and 2008, while the comparable number for university educated women were five months. Not counting deaths attributable to smoking, the former group’s life expectancy increased to four months and the latter’s to just over five months.

Source: Medical Xpress, 11 December 2017

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Parliamentary Activity
Parliamentary Questions

Mr Gregory Campbell, DUP East Londonderry
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate his Department has made of number of adults annually giving up smoking as a result of vaping; and whether there has been an increase in the number of adults giving up smoking since vaping became more common practice.

Answered by:
Steve Brine, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Public Health and Primary Care

The Office for National Statistics has published data on e-cigarette use in England annually since 2014. Data is published at the following link:
https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/healthandsocialcare/healthandlifeexpectancies/datasets/ecigaretteuseinengland

The statistics show that in 2014 there was a total of 1.6 million e-cigarette users with 0.6 million of those ex-cigarette smokers. In 2016 e-cigarette use had increased to 2.4 million users, with 1.3 million of those ex-cigarette smokers. Smoking prevalence in England is currently at 15.5%, the lowest it has ever been.

Source: Parliament, 11 December 2017

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