ASH Daily News 11 October 2017



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UK

  • British Psychological Society report says e-cigarettes ‘should be promoted as a means of stopping smoking’
  • Black County: Raids find illicit tobacco and alcohol
  • Scotland: Murray Royal Hospital now smokefree
  • Newcastle United backs Stoptober campaign
  • All-Party Parliamentary Carbon Monoxide Group calls for a greater effort to increase awareness of carbon monoxide poisoning

International

  • Researchers identify gene that influences nicotine dependence

UK
British Psychological Society report says e-cigarettes ‘should be promoted as a means of stopping smoking’

The British Psychological Society has issued a behaviour change briefing to provide guidance and education to those involved with smoking cessation services, suggesting that e-cigarettes can be endorsed as a quitting method.

The report also called for more information to be made available on the pros and cons of e-cigarette use and for steps to be taken to encourage new product development, allowing safer options to be created.

See More:
British Psychological Soceity: Changing behaviour: electronic cigarettes

Source: Zenopa, 10 October 2017
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Black County: Raids find illicit tobacco and alcohol

Trading standards seized more than £15,000 of illegal tobacco and counterfeit vodka during raids carried out in a Black Country borough.

Bob Charnley, Sandwell trading standards and licensing manager, said: “People who deal in illegal tobacco are more likely to encourage others, especially children and young adults, to smoke. All tobacco is harmful but the illegal tobacco market and in particular the availability of cheap cigarettes makes it harder for smokers to quit.”

Source: Express and Star, 11 October 2017
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Scotland: Murray Royal Hospital now smokefree

Murray Royal Hospital has become officially smokefree after a successful trial. Smoking is not permitted at all mental health sites under NHS Tayside’s remit.

Alison Angus, a clinical in-patient team manager for general adult psychiatry at NHS Tayside, said: “Updating our smoking policy to include mental health services and supporting patients not to smoke on our grounds and sites is an essential part of providing the best possible care and treatment for all of our patients.”

Source: Daily Record, 9 October 2017
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Newcastle United backs Stoptober campaign

Dr Paul Catterson, Newcastle United’s club doctor, said: “We are pleased to be supporting the Stoptober campaign, which encourages people to give up smoking for the entire month with a view to kicking the habit for good. I would encourage anyone who currently smokes to give the campaign a go. We wish everyone taking part the best of luck.”

A spokesperson for the Football Supporters Federation, said: “This research highlights the prevalence of smoking amongst fans but more importantly, their desire to quit is high and should be supported by clubs across England. Football clubs are at the heart of local communities so it’s fantastic to see so many getting on board with Stoptober to encourage those who want help in quitting.”

Source: NCUF, 10 October 2017
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All-Party Parliamentary Carbon Monoxide Group calls for a greater effort to increase awareness of carbon monoxide poisoning

Official figures suggest that 50 people die from carbon monoxide poisoning each year in Britain, and 200 are hospitalised. However, experts believe these numbers could be a gross underestimate, as symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning, such as tiredness, headaches, confusion and nausea, can be easily misdiagnosed.

A report to be published today by the All-Party Parliamentary Carbon Monoxide Group calls for a greater effort to increase awareness of carbon monoxide poisoning — including among doctors — with a focus on people at risk of a misdiagnosis, such as elderly patients with dementia, or expectant mothers with ‘pregnancy’ symptoms.

Source: Daily Mail, 10 October 2017
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International
Researchers identify gene that influences nicotine dependence

A DNA variant commonly found in people of European and African descent increases the likelihood of developing nicotine dependence, smoking heavily, and developing lung cancer, according to a new study led by RTI International.

The new study, published in Molecular Psychiatry, is the largest genome-wide association study of nicotine dependence. Researchers studied more than 38,600 former and current smokers from the United States, Iceland, Finland, and the Netherlands

See More:
Molecular Psychiatry: Genome-wide association study across European and African American ancestries identifies a SNP in DNMT3B contributing to nicotine dependence

Source: Medical Xpress, 10 October 2017
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ASH Daily News comprises digests of published news on smoking-related topics. ASH is not responsible for the content of external websites. ASH does not necessarily endorse the material contained in this bulletin.