ASH Daily News 1 August 2017



  • British American Tobacco investigated by Serious Fraud Office
  • USA: Tobacco: smoke signals
  • USA: Plan to cut smoking with non-addictive cigarettes has flaws
  • Scotland: Tobacco industry tries to minimise impact of open display tobacco product ban
  • Scotland: Smoking banned from entire West College Scotland campus

 
British American Tobacco investigated by Serious Fraud Office

UK tobacco firm British American Tobacco (BAT) says it is under official investigation by the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) over allegations it paid bribes in East Africa.

BAT said that it had been investigating the claims through external legal advisers and it had been co-operating with the SFO.

Source: BBC, 1 August 2017
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USA: Tobacco: smoke signals

The Trump administration is making little legislative headway. But it can at least slash regulations with gusto. Surprising, then, that a government that has rolled back rules on power plant emissions should propose new ones on personal lung pollution.

Shares in Altria have fallen 9 per cent and British American Tobacco by 7 per cent since the Food and Drug Administration said it aimed to reduce nicotine in cigarettes to lessen their addictive properties, while supporting new safer alternatives.

Yet the US is not such a hostile place for Big Tobacco. Even as the number of smokers in the US has continued to fall, industry revenues have risen thanks to higher prices. Of course the industry remains vulnerable to government intervention. But there is a long way to go before any new restrictions are implemented.

Source: Financial Times, 31 July 2017
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USA: Plan to cut smoking with non-addictive cigarettes has flaws

Linda Bauld writes an oped on why the bold proposal in the US to cut cigarette nicotine to sub-addictive levels is interesting, but there are big challenges to making it work.

“Cigarettes are available globally, and selling less-addictive versions in the US could result in a black market in imported or counterfeit products. Reducing the nicotine might also mean smokers take in more toxicants such as tar by puffing harder and for longer on their cigarettes – something the FDA plans to test in a consultation period.

It is important to remember that nicotine is not the harmful constituent in cigarettes, but the many nasties present in the tar. It remains to be seen how viable this move is.”

Source: New Scientist, 31 July 2017
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Scotland: Tobacco industry tries to minimise impact of open display tobacco product ban

Tobacco companies have stepped up efforts to minimise the impact of the point of sale display ban on their products in convenience stores or ‘corner shops’ in Scotland, by offering retailers a new range of incentives to prioritise their brands, reveals research published online in the journal Tobacco Control.

Prompted by reports that tobacco companies were using financial incentives to try and minimise the impact of the ban in Canada and Australia, the researchers wanted to see if similar practices were going on in Scottish ‘corner shops’, or convenience stores. Retailers described being offered, and benefiting from, a range of financial and other incentives, usually via tobacco company sales reps, in return for a range of preferential practices.

See More:
Tobacco Control: Tobacco companies’ use of retailer incentives after a ban on point-of-sale tobacco displays in Scotland

Source: Medical Xpress, 31 July 2017
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Scotland: Smoking banned from entire West College Scotland campus

Smoking and vaping will be banned from the entire West College Scotland campus from August 1, after receiving complaints from non-smokers and facing a litter problem in designated smoking areas.

Smoking shelters will be removed, said the college, and there will be workshops provided to help people quit smoking. A Stop Smoking Challenge app, which has been developed by NHS Scotland, will also be launched.

The decision to introduce a complete ban was made unanimously by a working group set up by the college’s health and safety committee and backed by management. The group included staff and students, smokers and non-smokers.

Source: Clydebank Post, 31 July 2017
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