ASH Daily News 08 May 2017



  • More than half of UK vapers ‘have given up smoking’
  • Council tenants ‘must stop smoking’, says public health chief
  • Tobacco products and e-cigarette cross-border sales regulations updated
  • Birmingham: High rate of women smoking while pregnant in Birmingham

 

More than half of UK vapers ‘have given up smoking’

For the first time, more than half of the UK’s electronic-cigarette users have since given up smoking tobacco, a study suggests.

Some 1.5 million vapers are ex-smokers, compared with 1.3 million who still use tobacco, a survey of 12,000 adults for Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) found. But ASH said the message that vaping was much less harmful than smoking had not yet got through to all smokers. Scientists say current evidence suggests that the risks of exposure to toxins for e-cigarette users are likely to be low – and much lower than with tobacco.

Deborah Arnott, ASH’s chief executive, said the figures on vapers who had quit smoking were “excellent news” but that the rate of people switching to electronic versions had peaked.

See also:
ASH: Use of e-cigarettes among adults in Great Britain

Source: BBC News, 8th May 2017
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Council tenants ‘must stop smoking’, says public health chief

Smoking should be banned in new council houses to protect children, a public health professional has said. Tenants would be required to sign an agreement not to smoke in new local authority or housing association homes. In America public housing agencies must bring in a smokefree policy by August 2018.

Professor John Middleton, president of the Faculty of Public Health, said adults smoking in the home damaged the development of children’s lungs and put babies at risk of cot death.

Deborah Arnott, chief executive of ASH, said the health charity had a call last week from a woman whose granddaughter had cystic fibrosis and had never been able to visit because neighbours’ smoke from communal areas drifted into the grandmother’s home. Arnott said people were often “frustrated by councils’ and social landlords’ failure to take action”.

Editorial note: full quote from Deborah Arnott: “Just this week we were called by a grandmother whose granddaughter has cystic fibrosis. Her granddaughter has never been to visit her because the neighbours smoke in the communal areas and this drifts into her home. This is not uncommon, most weeks ASH receives a call from someone who’s life is being made miserable by neighbours who smoke and they are often frustrated by councils’ and social landlords’ failure to take action. We need to see landlords adopt policies that protect non-smokers while not being unsupportive to smokers. While such policies may not be easily created or implemented there are real opportunities to improve health, reduce the cost of tobacco to local communities and to tackle neighbour disputes.”

Source: The Sunday Times, 7th May 2017
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Tobacco products and e-cigarette cross-border sales regulations updated

Public Health England have released updated guidance for businesses on the sale of tobacco and e-cigarettes. Since 20 May 2016, businesses have had to register in order to supply tobacco products and/or e-cigarettes via cross-border distance sales, for example online sales. Public Health England have now updated the list of countries that the legislation pertains to, as well as the list of currently registered retailers.

Registration is a legal requirement under the EU Tobacco Products Directive (2014/40/EU).

Source: Public Health England, 4th May 2017
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Birmingham: High rate of women smoking while pregnant in Birmingham

New NHS figures show one in four women who go to NHS antenatal classes in part of the West Midlands is a smoker – one of the highest rates in the country.

Regionally, the highest proportion of women smoking at the time of booking an antenatal appointment in December 2016 was in the North of England, where 16% of women were classified as current smokers.

The risks of smoking during pregnancy are serious, from premature delivery to increased risk of miscarriage, stillbirth or sudden infant death.

Source: Birmingham Mail, 5th May 2017
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