ASH Daily News 07 July 2017



  • An oral history of Britain’s smoking ban
  • Love Island receives more complaints about contestants smoking than having sex on camera
  • Office vaping is big business 10 years after the smoking ban
  • Nottinghamshire Country Council has £85m invested in tobacco companies
  • USA: Tobacco use on the big and small screens is a public health concern
  • France to raise price of cigarettes in bid to stub out national smoking habit

 

An oral history of Britain’s smoking ban

Ten years after it was introduced, Vice talks to the politicians, campaigners and pub owners instrumental in making the ban happen.

On life before the ban, Deborah Arnott, director of Action on Smoking and Health, says: “The culture was that smokers felt it was their right to smoke, and they didn’t really consider the impact on those around them. The pubs were quite disgusting, and it also had health impacts on workers. By 2003, research showed that if you’re exposed to second-hand smoke and you’re not a smoker, your risks of getting lung cancer or having a heart attack were significantly increased.”

Source: Vice, 6 July 2017
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Love Island receives more complaints about contestants smoking than having sex on camera

More than half the complaints the broadcasting watch dog has had about the ITV2 show have been about smoking rather than footage of a sexual nature.

While intimate scenes have been a key focus of the show, the frequent scenes of the Islanders smoking cigarettes have been the thing to rile viewers. Of the 46 complaints Ofcom has received about the ITV2 series so far, 24 of those were from viewers who were objecting to the portrayal of smoking on the popular reality show.

Source: Mirror, 6 July 2017
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Office vaping is big business 10 years after the smoking ban

British workers are opting for smoking alternatives 10 years on from British buildings going smoke-free.

A new report has been released on the various concerns of bosses when it comes to office vaping. Encouraging bosses to set clear and distinct policies emphasising the differences between smoking and vaping, the guide reminds employers that de-normalising smoking through e-cigarette policies could make a dramatic difference to their workers’ health, with a 2015 report suggesting vaping could be up to 95% safer than tobacco.

“The evidence is clear that vaping is much less harmful than smoking and that e-cigarettes are helping many smokers to quit,” said Professor Kevin Fenton, who was until recently the National Director of health and wellbeing at Public Health England.

See More:
Personnel Today: Workplace smoking ban 10 years on: Common employer queries

Source: PA Life, 6 July 2017
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Nottinghamshire County Council pension fund has £85m invested in tobacco companies

The pension fund, which is administered by Nottinghamshire County Council and used by several other organisations throughout the county, has £85,728,471 currently invested in tobacco companies.

The city council and county council have both come out strongly against smoking in recent years, and are both responsible for maintaining public health, including smoking cessation services, within their respective districts.

Nottingham County Council pensions chief, Nigel Stephenson, said the investments had been made ‘decades’ ago. In February of this year, the council commissioned a report to look into the possibility of selling their shares in tobacco companies, also known as ‘divesting from’ tobacco.

Its author, independent adviser William Bourne, looked into the feasibility and desirability of selling tobacco shares, and found: “The law is clear that to pursue a policy of divesting from tobacco, the fund would need to show either that there is a financial case for doing so, or that there would be no significant financial detriment from doing so.

Source: Nottingham Post, 5 July 2017
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USA: Tobacco use on the big and small screens is a public health concern

A new report released today by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) analyzing smoking in top-grossing movies finds that one in four youth-rated movies continue to include tobacco imagery and the decline in the number of movies with smoking has stalled.

Smoking imagery is also prevalent in video games, including many teen-rated games. A report released by Truth Initiative, Played: Smoking and Video Games, found that smoking is prevalent and often glamorized in video games played by youth and video game content descriptors often fail to mention tobacco use, making it difficult for parents to monitor games for tobacco imagery.

Tobacco use on screen is a public health concern because, as the U.S. Surgeon General reported in 2012, exposure to smoking imagery in movies can cause young people to start smoking. In fact, youth who are heavily exposed to onscreen smoking imagery are approximately two to three times as likely to begin smoking, compared to youth who are lightly exposed.

See More:
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Tobacco Use in Top-Grossing Movies — United States, 2010–2016
Truth Initiative: Played: Smoking and Video Games

Source: IT Briefing, 6 July 2017
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France to raise price of cigarettes in bid to stub out national smoking habit

France will raise the price of cigarettes to 10 euros (£8.79) a pack within three years, the health minister said on Thursday, confirming a strategy that will push tobacco costs to among the highest in Europe.

At present, a packet of 20 cigarettes costs roughly seven euros (£6.15) in France, well below the roughly 10 euros charged in Britain and Ireland.

“France is one of the slowest learners in the world on smoking,” the minister, Agnes Buzyn, said. “Big price rises will be needed to have an impact on public health.”

Source: Independent, 6 July 2017
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