ASH Daily News 04 May 2017



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  • ‘Social smokers’ face same risk of heart disease as everyday users, research finds
  • Lawyer warns of potential industry influence over public health laws due to Brexit
  • Summary of the #ActOnTobacco week of action
  • Northern Ireland: District celebrating ten year anniversary of Northern Ireland’s smokefree legislation
  • USA: San Francisco foundation aims to eliminate cigarette littering

 

‘Social smokers’ face same risk of heart disease as everyday users, research finds

US researchers have found that the risk of high blood pressure and worrying cholesterol is the same for social smokers as those who light up every day.

More than 10% of the 39,000 people surveyed said they were ‘social smokers’ compared with 17% who said they smoked daily. The study found that around 75% of both groups had high blood pressure, while 54% had high cholesterol.

See also:
American Journal of Health Promotion: An Epidemiological Study of Population Health Reveals Social Smoking as a Major Cardiovascular Risk Factor
Daily Mail: Social smoking ‘as bad for you as a regular cigarette’
Science Daily: Social smoking carries same heart-disease risks as everyday habit

Source: The Telegraph, 3rd May 2017
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Lawyer warns of potential industry influence over public health laws due to Brexit

People in Britain risk losing their “fundamental right to health” after Brexit, a barrister, Peter Roderick, and public health professor, Allyson M Pollock, have warned.

Tobacco and alcohol companies might win more easily in court cases such as the recent battle over plain cigarette packaging if the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights is abandoned, they wrote in the British Medical Journal (BMJ).

Tamara Hervey, a law professor at the University of Sheffield, told The Independent: “Brexit[…]could indeed give powerful companies more leverage against consumers, patients and citizens”.

See also: BMJ: Brexit’s Great Repeal Bill will axe the right to health

Source: The Independent, 3rd May 2017
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Summary of the #ActOnTobacco week of action

After a successful week of social media campaigning to draw attention to the global harm caused by tobacco, ASH are now wrapping up our Week of Action. Together we sharpened the focus on the injustices committed by the tobacco industry, like child labour, deforestation, marketing and children, and the disproportionate economic strain on Low and Middle Income Countries.

Though our week is ending, we encourage all to continue to #ActOnTobacco. Follow ASH on Twitter to stay up to date with the latest tobacco news and to carry this conversation forward.

Source: Action on Smoking and Health, 4th May 2017
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Northern Ireland: District celebrating ten year anniversary of Northern Ireland’s smokefree legislation

Derry City and Strabane District Council are this week celebrating the ten year anniversary of Northern Ireland officially becoming smokefree.

On Monday April 30th 2007 legislation came into effect to ensure that all enclosed work spaces, including vehicles, would become smokefree, thus reducing the health impacts of smoking, particularly passive smoking.

Mayor of Derry City and Strabane District Council, Alderman Hilary McClintock, today welcomed the anniversary and acknowledged the huge impact the law has had on the health of people across the region.

Source: Derry Daily, 3rd May 2017
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USA: San Francisco foundation aims to eliminate cigarette littering

The Surfrider Foundation, a non-profit organisation dedicated to the protection and enjoyment of the coasts, teamed up with gyro San Francisco in an effort to de-normalise the act of littering cigarettes and to get people thinking twice about their behaviour.

The campaign, entitled ‘Snuffed Out Marine Life’, seeks to raise awareness and open a dialogue about this behaviour change through arresting visuals that directly connect cigarette butt litter to wildlife.

More than four trillion cigarette butts are littered every year, impacting the environment and flowing down into the Earth’s waterways. Used cigarette butts leach chemicals, such as arsenic and nicotine, and heavy metals, including lead, cadmium and chromium, into the water and soil, which impact marine life, habitats and ecosystems.

Source: Little Black Book, 3rd May 2017
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