ASH Daily News 02 May 2017



  • Study finds smoking weakens a gene that protects arteries
  • FCTC 2030: Supporting action to tackle tobacco
  • Britain gives £15 million to global anti-smoking campaigns
  • Warwickshire: Health bosses step up help for people who want to quit smoking
  • USA: Smokefree policies help decrease smoking rates for LGBT population
  • Canada: Flavoured tobacco ban now in effect on P.E.I.

 

Study finds smoking weakens a gene that protects arteries

People who smoke cigarettes may boost their risk of clogged heart arteries by weakening a gene that is otherwise protective of these important blood vessels, US researchers said Monday.

The findings point to a genetic explanation for how smoking can lead to the plaque buildup that stiffens arteries and causes heart disease, said the report in the journal Circulation.

See Also:
Medical Xpress: Smoking-related heart disease tied to effects of a single gene
Science Magazine: Scientists find a likely genetic driver of smoking-related heart disease

Source: The Daily Mail, 1st May 2017
Read Article
FCTC 2030: Supporting action to tackle tobacco

Tobacco harms all forms of development, from health and housing to education and climate change. This is driving poverty. At the national level it hampers sustainable development while at an individual level families across the world spend money on tobacco that could otherwise be spent on food, education and healthcare.

Implementation of the World Health Organizations’ Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) can change this picture; and implementation of the FCTC is enshrined in both the Sustainable Development Goals and Financing for Development Agenda. However, the tobacco industry fights relentlessly against these measures

Source: ASH, 1st May 2017
Read Article
Britain gives £15 million to global anti-smoking campaigns

The Department of Health set aside around £15 million for the implementation of tobacco control policies around the world. The cash is part of a £150 million pot that the Department of Health has committed to spend abroad in the past year. The £15 million will be sent to 15 countries including Cambodia, Colombia, Egypt, Nepal, Samoa, Sierra Leone, Sri Lanka and Zambia to help people quit smoking.

Critics from UKIP and the Taxpayers Alliance have said that the money should be spent in Britain.

NB: The Mail and the Mail on Sunday are both campaigning for the abolition of the UK’s legal commitment to meet the UN’s aid spending target, which is 0.7% of Gross National Income.

Source: Daily Mail, 1st May 2017
Read Article
Warwickshire: Health bosses step up help for people who want to quit smoking

South Warwickshire NHS Foundation Trust (SWFT) and Warwickshire County Council have teamed-up in a bid to encourage smokers to quit the habit by signing the NHS Statement of Support for Tobacco Control. The document has been developed by ASH to allow the NHS to support council colleagues in their tobacco control work.

By signing the statement SWFT has publicly committed to play an active role in planning and support all efforts in Warwickshire to help people stop smoking.

SWFT chief executive Glen Burley said: “One of our key objectives focuses on empowering local people to manage their own health and wellbeing and stopping smoking is one of the best ways to do this.

Source: Leamington Observer, 30th April 2017
Read Article
USA: Smokefree policies help decrease smoking rates for LGBT population

Tobacco use remains the leading preventable cause of death and disability in the United States. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, cigarette smoking among lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT) individuals is higher than among heterosexual adults—nearly 24 percent of the LGBT population smoke compared to nearly 17 percent of the straight population. Now, researchers from the University of Missouri have found evidence of lower smoking prevalence and greater intentions to quit among the LGBT smokers who live in communities with smoke-free policies.

Researchers surveyed participants during Missouri Pride festivals with questions about where they live, personal tobacco use and support for smoke-free policies. They found that 94 percent of those who live in smoke-free communities were more likely to want to quit smoking compared to just 76 percent of those who lived in places without smoking bans.

Source: Medical Xpress, 1st May 2017
Read Article
Canada: Flavoured tobacco ban now in effect on P.E.I.

Retailers across Prince Edward Island are no longer allowed to sell flavoured tobacco, thanks to a new law that took effect Monday. The ban prohibits the sale of products like grape or peach flavoured chewing tobacco or cigarettes. It’s a move the Canadian Cancer Society on P.E.I. applauds because the products were considered more appealing to younger smokers.

The society’s executive director, Marlene Mulligan, said the next step is to lobby for a ​legal minimum smoking age. “There’s about 300 municipalities in the U.S., including Hawaii and California illegal under 21…so I think that would be a good move.” Mulligan said the cancer society is also lobbying the federal government for plain cigarette packaging and less accessible tobacco vape products.

Source: CBC News, 1st May 2017
Read Article